Latin American Folklore







Central American Folklore

Read folktales, myths, legends and other stories from Central America.

  • Anansi Borrows Money
    Bra Anansi was one of the trickiest guys around. He and Mrs. Anansi had just gotten married and Mrs. Anansi got pregnant. When it came time for her to deliver, Anansi didn’t have enough money to pay the midwife. He only needed five dollars to pay her, so he decided to borrow it from his friends. (Belize)
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  • The legend of the Turrialba
    Many years it has, before the conquest, inhabited this fertile region, strong and brave Indians. The Cacique, old widower, took care of like only treasure his daughter, beautiful young person of fifteen years, body esbelto, chests in maturation, provocative brown meats. (Costa Rica) Spanish version

     

  • The Siguanaba
    It is a Salvadoran myth that speaks of an appearance in form of woman with face covered by thick, black-gray hair, arms with fine hands, amarfiladas, long and thin fingers with shining nails and pointed. The Siguanaba only appears to them by the nights... (El Salvador) Spanish version

     

  • The Man Who Sold His Soul
    A good but unfortunate man decides to leave hardships selling his soul to the devil. (Guatemala) Spanish version

     

  • The Invisible Hunters
    Late one Saturday afternoon, three brothers left the village of Ulwas on the Coco River in Nicaragua. They were going to hunt wari, the wild pig which is so delicious to eat. After walking an hour through the bush, they heard a voice. "Dar. Dar. Dar." said the voice. The brothers stopped. They looked around, but there was nobody there. Then they heard the voice again. "Dar. Dar. Dar." The voice came from a vine that was swinging from a tree in front of them. (Nicaragua)

     

  • Hunahpu and Ixbalanque
    In the beginning of time there was no Earth, no Sun and no Moon. There only existed Heaven, the house of Gucumatz, the father and mother of all the creatures, and Hell, the house of the Ahauab de Xibalba, the Lords of Hell. (Honduras)

 

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