World Folklore





World Folklore



Garlic: Superstitions, Folklore and Fact

According to Pliny, garlic and onions were invoked as deities by the Egyptians at the taking of oaths. The inhabitants of Pelusium in lower Egypt, who worshipped the onion, are said to have held both it and garlic in aversion as food.

Holiday Stories

Holiday stories from Christmas, Hanukkah, and Kwanzaa traditions, as well as tales from African-American and Jewish folklore.

The Rooster and the Pearl

Scratch. Scratch. Peck. Cock was strutting around the yard, busily looking for good things to eat. Peck, peck scratch. He gobbled down a piece of barley-corn with greedy satisfaction. Yum!

Thor's Wedding

"Hold still, Thor. I'm trying to fix your train." Loki folded a piece of white silk and applied the pins. "I look ridiculous," said Thor gloomily. The huge red-haired thunder god stared in the mirror at his muscular frame squeezed into the tight wedding gown. He frowned. Outside thunder growled in response.

What We Plant, We Will Eat

Many moons ago, two brothers lived with their father in a small house in Korea. The younger brother worked hard and was kind to all he met. The elder, knowing he was to inherit his father's prosperous rice farm, was arrogant and proud. He scorned his younger brother and ignored his aging father.

Why is a Black Cat bad luck?

Black Cats weren’t always considered bad luck. In early Egyptian times, dating back as far as 3000 BC, the domesticated cat became a symbol of grace and poise and was praised for its ability to kill cobras and other vermin.
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